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accused of plotting a terror attack on u.s. soil. a live report coming up. >>> nasa struggling to find its footing after retiring the shuttle program. we'll take a look at a new study suggesting that underfunding could threaten america's future in space. >> all three engines up and burning. two, one, zero and lift-off, the finalist off of atlantis on the shoulders of the space shuttle. america will continue the dream. jon: that was the final space shuttle launch july 8th, 2011 signaling the end of an era for nasa. federal funding for the space agency has fallen flat. it has come under constant threats of more cuts in recent years. a new study suggests that underfunding and lack of focus could lead to nasa's demise. despite the mars rover curiosity and president's calls for manned missions to mars, nasa appears to be losing its edge in space exploration? we have tom jones, four times former shuttle as snow naught for nasa and planetary scientist. what do you think of nasa's problems? at this point there are no plans to return humans to space until 2020, is that right, tom? >> americans are
't. joining us now on the phone retired u.s. air force colonel, current nasa astronauts dr. coleman spent more than 4,000 hours in space aboard the space shuttle columbia on board the international space station, she's done it all. dr. coleman, katie, great to have you here. >> it's nice to be there. >> jamie: what is that anniversary, that date, today, mean to you? >> well, the fact that it's 40 years since apollo 17, in some ways, it seems like such a big number and yet, i think that what we've done in the meantime is just simply amazing and to think back this is the last time that we had people that walked on the moon, whatever we had one of these anniversaries, i call a friend of mine, andy tinken, wrote "a man on the moon", what were they thinking, what was it like for them. what kind of a mission. apparently apollo 17 broke all the records, it was the longest mission and they brought back the most lunar samples and longest time in lunar orbit and simply amazing mission and so, you know, in early december here in 2012 to celebrate 40 years, it makes me really proud of what i do today. >>
of this world. right now nasa is revealing the latest discovery on mars. ready in welcome to brand-new hour of "happening now," i'm jon scott. jenna: i'm jenna lee. uncovering new knowledge about the red planet. today's announcement comes nearly four months after the six-wheeled robot landed in a giant crater. nasa unveiling the latest findings today as a gathering of scientists around the world come together. claudia cowen joins us by phone. >> reporter: this would be a game change err but most likely not. this may be a little overhyped after one scientist said that the data would be one for the record books. that was tweeted by curiosity itself through a twitter account run by nasa's jet propulsion lab. for the past few weeks nasa has had to real in expectations issuing a press release saying today's news quote will be the update about the first use of the rove verse full array of analytical instruments to inspect a drift of sandy soil. some say they may have uncovered methane, and that aliens may have been decomposing. the rover is working to identify organic compounds to see if mars can
on the moon and now nasa is focused on other missions. a look at the private company that is planning the next moon shot. >> i understand that some believe we should attempt a return to the surface of the moon first. as previously planned. i just have to say pretty bluntly here, we have been there before. buzz has been there. >>> bottom of the hour and let's get you caught up on the headlines. dallas cowboys' defensive lineman joshua brent arrested and charged in the death of a teammate, jerry brown, junior. brown was killed in a car crash. police say brent was speeding and driving while intoxicated. >>> a suspect in the deadly terror attack in ben benghazi arrested in egypt. he is the alleged ringleader of an egyptian terrorist net, would. and tomorrower south african president nelson mandela has been admitted to a military hospital. he is undergoing -- undergoing medical tests. they say there is, quote, no cause for alarm. >>> new jobs numbers are out for november. the jobless rate is dropping to 7.7%. that is the lowest rate in four years. sounds good, right? well some analysts say the numb
40 years since that historic scene. the final nasa mission sending a man to walk on the moon. last person to do that. he is the commander of a apollo 17 and the last ever made on the moon's surface leaving a special legacy for america's space program. joining us live. captain eugene cernan and last man to walk on the moon. i can't tell you how excited i was to talk to you today. thank you for joining us. >> you are welcome heather. you might have guessed i had no requests for auditions. >> heather: did you plan ahead what you were going sing and what you were going to do? >> no, we didn't. we plan ahead all we're going to from a scientific, but everything else you heard from most of these missions, your reaction to the environment and reaction to things. even things that were said when we left the moon, they come to you because of what you are confronted with. >> heather: explain to us. take us all back there that moment when you first stepped foot on the to the moon surface. what did you see and what did it feel like? >> well, heather, my first step was mine. no matter what a lot
at the joint press conference that nasa was carrying out in houston and moscow because it will, as you mentioned, be american scott kelly and the russian mikha mikhail kornienko. and this is a huge, huge first step. you can't underestimate it. if eventually there is going to be long duration flights to an astroid or on to mars, you not only have to have an understanding of the technical issues that you might face but what the body will go through over a course of year or two years in space. there just isn't enough of a baseline of information right now. so this is going to be hugely important. because, for instance, blood pressure goes down when you're on a long duration mission. you lose a lot of body mass and bone mass and muscle mass. the eyes change. there's an eye loss issue. eyesight loss issue that astronauts are facing coming back even from the duration of space flights they are doing now on the international space station. so a lot you have to understand about how the body is affected by weightlessness and also behavioral issues. if you and i go on this two-year mission, are w
. scientists want to analyze how the human body reacts to long-term exposure in orbit. this is part of nasa's larger plan to one day send man to mars but the journey, get this, takes eight months one way. so they must understand how the body reacts to those conditions. researchers already know it can affect eyesight. >> we discovered that some crewmembers are having some pressure in their intracain ya'll pressure, pressure in the vain system in their brains and spinal cord especially. that was causing in some crewmembers a vision impact. >> reporter: training for this mission starts early next year with the official launch date in the spring of 2015. jenna. jenna: pretty remarkable. when you think about the story, you wonder why can't we do the fiscal cliff thing? >> reporter: right. jenna: if we can put somebody in space for a year. >> reporter: we need to ask our lawmakers, right. jenna: casey, incredible story. gregg: you can put the man on the moon but you can't --. all right. researchers may have found what could be the earliest known dinosaur to walk the earth. the mysterious fossil f
from nasa and it illustrates why superstrong sandy is ranked as one of the worst natural disasters to ever hit our nation and how it caused such widespread destruction. stretching from maine to the colts take on the sandy brought a storm surge along the mid-atlantic coast northward including a surge to 11 feet and the long island. massive storms and sustained winds were 90 miles per hour with hurricane force wind approximately 75 miles to the center and tropical storm force winds extending outward approximately 485 miles. according to fema, superstrong sandy winscombe storm surges and flooding hit 12 states. more than 8 million people lost power. transportation systems in new york, philadelphia, boston and washington d.c. shut down and over 12,000 commercial flights were halted. communities up and down the coast are battered. federal government has a responsibility to help in the recovery effort. initial estimates from new york and new jersey alone of disaster assistance total more than $70 billion, a staggering number. sandy demonstrates clearly why it is so important to move forw
at night revealing a planet that is really never in the dark. nasa releasing these pictures that were taken not by me, but by a special satellite called sumy npp. we're about to show you the united states, you can see it coming into frame, and you can see how the lights illuminating from the ground look a lot like the stars and the constellations we see when we look up at night. and here's a bird's eye view of egypt's nile river lit up by boats. yes, those are lights from boats. the reason these images are possible is because of a new sensor that is onboard the camera which stands for the national polar orbiting partnership. it was launched last year. it gives scientists -- and us -- a brand new way to observe what our planet looks like once the sun goes down. what do you think of that, jon? jon: that's cool. and atlanta really stands out in the shot of the sort of, you know, eastern seaboard. i don't know, it's kind of interesting. i was surprised that atlanta is so big and bright. >> reporter: atlanta and, of course, the northeast. and you can see there that sort of corridor up in new yor
at citi.com/pricerewind. >>> new assurances this week from nasa that the world will not end on december 21st. people around the globe are stockpiling supplies just in case. joining me now an astronomy professor in california. thank you for being here. i'm so glad to talk with you about this. there's so much attention on this mayan calendar. supposedly signalling an end to the world on december 21st. what's the truth, andrew, behind this calendar? does it really predict the world's end? >> i like to call this fiction science instead of science fiction. this is completely baseless. there's not a shred of evidence in favor of it. but it sure is a lot of fun to be worrying about the end of the world. hollywood knows that, too. as far as the mayan calendar is considered, alex, this is a complete misunderstanding of how calendars work. look, we faced this kind of calendar cliff every year when on december 31 you run out of pages on your calendar. you don't think it's the end of the world. you just think it's time to go to the stationery store and buy a new calendar. we are according to some expe
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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